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Kitchen Hack: Perfect Hard Cooked Eggs



Joan Salge Blake, MS, RDN, LDNThis featured post is by Joan Salge Blake, MS, RDN, LDN. You can follow this blogger @JoanSalgeBlake.

At less than 20 cents each, you can’t beat eggs as an inexpensive source of protein, vitamin D and choline, a compound that is needed for healthy cells and nerves. The beauty of a hard-cooked egg is that you can eat them for breakfast, lunch, dinner or even as a high protein snack.

Added food safety tip: Store eggs on the refrigerator shelf, not in the egg holders on the door, so they remain at a safe temperature of 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below.

How do you cook them? It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3.

  1. Place eggs in a small pot or saucepan and add water. (All eggs need to be entirely covered by the water.) On the stove or cooktop, heat pan until the water comes to a rapid boil.
  2. Carefully remove saucepan from heat and cover. Let pan sit covered on top of the stove or cooktop for about 15 minutes for extra-large eggs. 
  3. Carefully drain water and serve warm. Or cool under cold running water and immediately refrigerate any leftovers. Enjoy!   

Download and print: A Dozen Egg Safety Tips >

 

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