Edit ModuleShow Tags
Published:

Is That App OK for My Kids?



Is That App OK for My Kids? | Food and Nutrition Magazine | The Feed Blog

Article author photo. Ellen Schuster, MS, RD This featured post is by Ellen Schuster, MS, RD. You can follow this blogger on Facebook.

With today's children getting their first smartphone at an average of 10, parents need to be more vigilant than ever. As an RDN, you might be asked for recommendations for a child looking to learn about nutrition through an app, game or website. Before that happens, do a little research.

In her eatright.org article "6 Great Apps to Teach Kids about Nutrition," Marisa Moore, MBA, RDN, LD, writes: "With a plethora of apps on the market, finding the best ones can be daunting. Here are a few to start." If you're looking for even more options for nutrition apps and games, the USDA's SNAP-ed Connection offers recommendations of apps and web games for kids. Or, read tips about online safety from the Federal Trade Commission and the Internet Keep Safe Coalition, a nonprofit that provides new media safety education.

4 Questions to Ask Before Recommending Any App for Kids

Before downloading any app or game, however — even those recommended in the resources above — think for yourself. Consider these four questions before making any technology decisions when it comes to kids. Tweet this

  • Are there online reviews you can read? Reviews can help you get a sense of the pros and cons from different perspectives. I like to read children's technology reviews at Common Sense Media, because they use specific criteria — educational value, positive messages, violence and more — in their reviews, and users also provide feedback.
  • Does the app ask for the child's personal information? If the app asks for the location of the child, you might want to ask why this is necessary and consider turning off the device’s location services.
  • Does the app include a chat option (if yes, is it monitored)?
  • Does the app include advertising or banner ads? Clicking on ads can sometimes infect a device with a virus or malware. It is best to recommend commercial-free apps or games, though those may be difficult to find. Also consider the child's age when advertising is involved — a younger child might not know the difference between ads and content.


Ellen Schuster, MS, RD, is a registered dietitian with an interest in nutrition education and technology. She has been in practice for more than 30 years. Follow her on Facebook.
 

(Photo: harleebob/iStock/Thinkstock)

Edit Module
blog comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

National Wear Red Day is Friday

National Wear Red Day is Friday

As dietitians we can help to raise awareness and participate in the celebration of National Wear Red Day.
What is Coconut Flour? Plus a Coconut Flour Mini-Muffins Recipe

What is Coconut Flour? Plus a Coconut Flour Mini-Muffins Recipe

Coconut flour has a unique nutrition profile and makes a delicious, addition to all kinds of recipes, including this one for Coconut Flour Mini-Muffins.
Can Incentives Change Health Outcomes in South Africa?

Can Incentives Change Health Outcomes in South Africa?

From reduced gym membership fees to discounts on healthy foods to exclusive travel deals, financial incentives can be an attractive motivator for making healthy choices. But the most successful incentivized health programs don’t focus on monetary reward alone; they also embrace positive reinforcement, shared goals and the spirit of community.
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Advertise with Food & Nutrition
Edit ModuleShow TagsEdit ModuleShow Tags


The Feed

Covering the intersection of nutrition, information and technology.

About This Blog

Welcome to The Feed, a blog about the dynamic world of nutrition informatics. What is nutrition informatics? It is the intersection of nutrition, information and technology, and it is a major driving force supporting all areas of dietetics practice.

Learn about our guest blogs!

Comments Policy

Food & Nutrition Magazine provides this forum to exchange ideas, opinions and contributions within a positive community. Diverse viewpoints and constructive, respectful dialogue are welcome. Rudeness, misinformation, self-promotion and abuse are not. We reserve the right, without warning or notification, to remove comments and block users we determine violate this policy or our Terms & Conditions. You must include your name or be logged into a personal account on Disqus, Facebook, Twitter or Google+ to comment.

Archives