Edit ModuleShow Tags
Published:

Miriam Frucht: Providing Support through Long-Term Care



Photo: Charles Aydlett

What drew Miriam Frucht to the dietetics profession was a love of providing nutrition education to people who genuinely want to improve their lives. After completing her internship, she was most interested in building a career in long-term care. “I felt that was an area of nutrition where I would have the most impact,” Frucht says. 

Now, Frucht is the chief clinical dietitian at Margaret Tietz Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in the New York City borough of Queens, working primarily with older adults who are long-term residents of the facility. “Residents are admitted with multiple comorbidities, and it is my job to choose their medical nutrition therapy and provide education for them to better control their health,” Frucht says. 

The facility and Frucht have the privilege of caring for Holocaust survivors. “Survivors are uniquely attuned to the food they eat because of the severe deprivation and starvation they suffered, as well as fond food memories from before their suffering began,” Frucht says. 

Taking into account each resident’s customs, rituals, background and taste preferences, Frucht tailors meal plans to create a sense of familiarity and enjoyment. “I feel this enhances the patient’s life, as well as providing nutritious sustenance,” she says. 

With a keen attention to detail and care for every individual, Frucht succeeds at making a great impact on the facility’s long-term residents, as well as short-term rehab residents and hospice patients she oversees. “I constantly see the same residents when I come to work, and there is an acknowledgement and admiration for one another,” Frucht says. “To know that I can make a difference in their care is truly rewarding.”

Edit Module

More Articles

Picky vs. Problem Eater: A Closer Look at Sensory Processing Disorder

Picky vs. Problem Eater: A Closer Look at Sensory Processing Disorder

Formerly called sensory integration dysfunction, SPD occurs when the brain has trouble processing information through the senses. SPD exists on a spectrum, affecting one or more of the senses and usually with a combination of over- and under-sensitivities. It affects up to 16 percent of school-age children in the United States.
The Perfect Poach

The Perfect Poach

If preparing them at home makes you feel like you’re walking on eggshells, try these simple steps to master the perfect poach in no time.
Get Saucy Series: How Sweet It Is

Get Saucy Series: How Sweet It Is

A jar of homemade chocolate or butterscotch sauce can turn an ordinary dessert into an extraordinary occasion.
Edit Module

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Advertise with Food & Nutrition
Edit Module

View The Current Issue


The March/April 2017 issue is in the mail, and we'll be debuting the digital edition on our new platform any minute now. Thanks for your patience!

Edit ModuleShow TagsEdit Module

Tweets from Stone Soup Bloggers