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4 Rootsy Recipes

When roasted, baked, steamed or sautéed, root vegetables take on an earthy, rich flavor — and keep their nutritious profile. Try these four ingenious root vegetable recipes.



Parsnip Soufflé

Developed by Carlene Thomas, RDN, LD

Ingredients
Parsnip Purée
1 cup pureed parsnip
1½ tablespoon olive oil
2 large parsnips
⅛ cup + 1 tablespoon vegetable or chicken stock
Salt and pepper to taste

Soufflé
3 tablespoons butter
⅛ cup whole wheat breadcrumbs
4 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan
1 cup skim milk
1 bay leaf
1 bunch thyme
1¾ tablespoons whole-wheat flour
3 egg yolks
4 egg whites (at 2 tablespoons each)
½ teaspoon salt

Directions

  1. Wash and slice parsnips into ⅓-inch rounds. Toss in olive oil, salt and pepper and put on a small baking pan in the oven at 400°F for 12 minutes.
  2. Flip parsnips after 12 minutes and roast for another 6 minutes. Parsnips will just be starting to turn golden brown as they are removed from the oven. Allow to cool slightly.
  3. To purée, add ⅛ cup chicken stock to a food processor and pulse until there are no chunks. (Purée will be thick with some fibers.)
  4. With 1 tablespoon of butter and a paper towel, coat the interior of the ramekins making sure to butter the base, crease and walls. Mix breadcrumbs and 2 tablespoons parmesan in a bowl and use to coat buttered ramekin interiors.
  5. In a small pot, add milk, bay leaf and thyme, and cover and simmer on low for 10 minutes to infuse herb flavors. Strain herbs, pour milk into a measuring cup and set aside. In the same pot, add butter and allow to melt.
  6. Add whole-wheat flour and whisk. Cook for one minute to remove floury taste. Slowly pour in herb infused milk, whisking to avoid lumps.
  7. Continue whisking on medium for three to five minutes until sauce begins to thicken. In a separate, medium-size bowl, place three egg yolks, beaten. Add half of the white sauce to the bowl of egg yolks and whisk vigorously.
  8. Add remaining white sauce and combine. Whisk in the parsnip purée and ¼ teaspoon of salt and the remaining 2 tablespoons grated parmesan.
  9. In a standing mixer, beat egg whites to stiff peaks. Into the mixer bowl, fold in one-third of the combined white sauce and parsnip purée at a time, making sure to dig to the bottom to fold in.
  10. Spoon in soufflé mix to each ramekin, filling three-quarters of the way. Smooth tops with back of spoon.
  11. Set oven to 400°F. Place ramekins on a pan with edges. Pour water into the pan to reach ¼ inch up sides of ramekins. Bake for 25-30 minutes until the tops are golden brown.
  12. Top with remaining salt and pepper and serve immediately.

Nutrition Information
Serves 5.
Serving size: 8 ounces

Calories: 257; Total fat: 16g; Saturated fat: 7g; Cholesterol: 137mg; Sodium: 474mg; Carbohydrates: 18g; Fiber: 3g; Sugars: 6g; Protein: 11g (Note: Bay leaf and thyme bunch not included; insignificant contribution.)


Carlene Thomas, RDN, LD, is a private practice and nutrition consultant in Northern Virginia. She is a Stone Soup blogger and author of healthfullyeverafter.co.


Rutabaga Fries with Old Bay Dipping Sauce

Salt & Vinegar Rutabaga Fries with Old Bay Dipping Sauce

Developed by Emily Cooper, RDN

Ingredients
Rutabaga Fries
1½ pounds rutabaga, peeled and cut into ½-inch thick wedges
2 cups + 2 tablespoons white vinegar, divided½ cup water
2 teaspoons + 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided

Dipping Sauce
½ cup ketchup
1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
1 teaspoon hot sauce

Directions

  1. Place rutabaga wedges into a large heat-safe bowl with tight fitting lid.
  2. In a medium saucepan, combine 2 cups of the vinegar, water and 2 teaspoons of salt in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over a high flame. Remove from heat and pour over prepared rutabaga.
  3. Secure lid onto bowl and store in the refrigerator for 2 to 4 hours.
  4. Preheat oven to 425° F. Coat two 12x16-inch baking sheets with non-stick cooking spray and set aside.
  5. Drain rutabaga wedges in a large colander and spread evenly on prepared baking sheets. Bake for 25 minutes, flipping wedges halfway through to brown evenly.
  6. Meanwhile, combine all of the sauce ingredients in a small bowl and set aside. Remove fries from oven and transfer to a large mixing bowl.
  7. Toss with remaining vinegar and salt. Transfer to a serving plate alongside dipping sauce.

Nutrition Information

Serves 4.
Serving size: 1 cup fries and 2 tablespoon sauce

Calories: 97; Total fat: 0g; Saturated fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 1288mg; Carbohydrates: 21g; Fiber: 3g; Sugars: 14g; Protein: 2g; Potassium: 550mg; Phosphorus: 87mg (Note: Assumed 25% absorption of marinade.)


Emily Cooper, RDN, is based in New Hampshire. She is a Stone Soup blogger and the author of SinfulNutrition.com.


Carrot Butter

Developed by Alexandra Caspero, MA, RD, CLT

Ingredients
1 pound carrots
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
½ cup macadamia nuts
¼ cup fresh orange juice
½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 teaspoons maple syrup
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 425°F.
  2. In a large bowl, toss together roughly chopped carrots, 1 tablespoon of olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper. (I use ¼ teaspoon salt and ⅛ teaspoon pepper)
  3. Arrange carrots in a single layer on a baking sheet or stone and cover with aluminum foil. Bake for 15 minutes.
  4. Remove pan from oven, remove foil and return carrots to the oven to cook for an additional 25-30 minutes until golden brown and soft.
  5. Remove from oven and let cool slightly.
  6. Place chopped carrots in a food processor along with macadamia nuts, cinnamon, maple syrup and vanilla extract. Pulse until combined.
  7. With the food processor blade running, slowly drizzle in the fresh orange juice and olive oil. The carrots should be creamy and spreadable. Depending on the strength of your food processer, you might need to add a little more orange juice.
  8. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Enjoy on toasted crostini, hearty crackers or as a unique pizza sauce.

Cooking Tip

  • Used steamed carrots and your butter will be ready in half the time.

Nutrition Information
Serves 8.
Serving size: ¼ cup

Calories: 141; Total fat: 12g; Saturated fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 104mg; Carbohydrates: 10g; Fiber: 2g; Sugars: 6g; Protein: 1g; Potassium: 181mg; Phosphorus: 33mg


Roasted Beet Butter

Developed by Alexandra Caspero, MA, RD, CLT

Ingredients
1½ pounds beets
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar, divided
½ cup hazelnuts, toasted and skin removed
¼ cup vegetable broth or water
5 ounces goat cheese
Salt
Pepper

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Wash and scrub beets, removing leaves if attached. Place beets on a large piece of foil and drizzle with 1 tablespoon each of the olive oil and balsamic. Wrap tightly and place in the oven to roast.
  3. Beets are done with they can be easily pieced with a knife, about 50-90 minutes depending on the size of the beets.
  4. When done, remove from oven and let cool slightly. Remove skin with a paper towel or by running the beet under cool water and rubbing skin off.
  5. Quarter beets and place in a food processer with the hazelnuts. Pulse to combine.
  6. Add the goat cheese and remaining balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Pulse to combine.
  7. Run the food processor and slowly add vegetable broth until the mixture becomes fluffy and smooth. You may not need all the vegetable broth. The beets should be smooth and spreadable.
  8. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground pepper.
  9. Spread on crostini, crackers, as a sandwich spread, or tossed with hot pasta.

Nutrition Information
Serves 20.
Serving size: ¼ cup

Calories: 144; Total fat: 11g; Saturated fat: 4g; Cholesterol: 11mg; Sodium: 206mg; Carbohydrates: 8g; Fiber: 2g; Sugars: 6g; Protein: 5g;


Alexandra Caspero, MA, RD, CLT, is a California-based dietitian, director of wellness and adjunct instructor at University of the Pacific. She is a Stone Soup blogger and author of delishknowledge.com.

 

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