Published:

Get to Know Nutritional Yeast



Nutritional yeast: not the prettiest thing ever

Article author photo. Lindsay Livingston, DTR, RD This featured post is by Lindsay Livingston, RD. You can follow this blogger @LeanGrnBeanBlog.

If you've spent any time perusing the bulk bins at your local grocery store lately, you may have noticed a product called nutritional yeast. Although the name sounds somewhat unappealing — and the appearance, as you can see in the photo above, is hardly any better — this product is a nutritional powerhouse. And it is something you definitely should know about.

What is Nutritional Yeast?
Nutritional yeast, also commonly called "nooch," is inactive yeast that is grown on molasses. It is yellow in color and typically comes in little flakes. Quite honestly, it looks like fish food. But don't let that scare you! It has a nutty, cheesy flavor and is often used to add that cheesy profile to vegan dishes.

Is it Good for Me?
Absolutely! Check out the nutritional info for just two tablespoons:

60 calories
1 gram of fat
5 milligrams of sodium
4 grams of fiber
Zero grams of sugar
9 grams of protein

Plus, it has tons of B vitamins and folate. Most brands of nutritional yeast also have Vitamin B12 added, which makes for a great option for vegans who aren't getting the B12 found in animal products. Nutritional yeast is also gluten-free and doesn't have any added sugars or preservatives. It can be found in the bulk bins at many grocery stores and is also sold online.

What Should I Do With It?
Nutritional yeast can be an acquired taste, so try easing into it by sprinkling it on things like popcorn and kale chips, adding it to pasta dishes, or simply mixing a couple tablespoons into whatever dish you're making to help enhance the flavor.

As you get used to it, you could use it to make a vegan "cheese" sauce, to replace breadcrumbs in homemade veggie burgers, to thicken sauces, or even to make things like salad dressings!

Nutritional yeast makes a great addition to any diet, whether you're a vegan, a carnivore or anything in between. Next time you're at the store, use the bulk bins to your advantage and buy a little bit to see if you like it.


Lindsay Livingston, RD, is a registered dietitian from Columbus, Ohio. She is an online nutrition coach and blogger at The Lean Green Bean. Follow her on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

blog comments powered by Disqus

More Stone Soup

Sleep Like an Athlete

Sleep Like an Athlete

I do not have to convince anyone that a good night’s sleep will help you achieve good health. The problem? How to build those seven to eight hours a day into your lifestyle. The secret to keeping your weight down and staying heart healthy may be in training like an athlete and keeping to a sleep schedule.
Red and Green Gnocchi for the Holidays

Red and Green Gnocchi for the Holidays

In the midst of all this holiday madness, it's more important than ever to stay healthy with home-cooked, well-balanced meals. With holiday parties, work events, cocktail receptions and family reunions this time of year, it's easy to let healthy cooking fall to the wayside. Who has any more time to spend in the kitchen after baking for the cookie swap and wrapping all those gifts!? One of my favorite meals to make during hectic times is this gnocchi-based dish with beans, tomatoes and greens.
Two Little Cheers for Kiwi

Two Little Cheers for Kiwi

I was having some trouble deciding what to write about, so I looked for help at home — I asked my twin four-year-old girls. When I mentioned kiwi as a possible topic, their overwhelmingly excited response came to me in full stereo. "I want some!"
No More Food Fights! Can Foodies and Farmers Get Along?

No More Food Fights! Can Foodies and Farmers Get Along?

The conversation around food does not have to go the way of religion or politics, a taboo topic not to be brought up in social circles. Food and nutrition professionals, farmers, and others interested in growing a more productive conversation about farm and food now have a new book with multiple perspectives to contribute to the food conversation.


Stone Soup

Guest bloggers from around the world share
with Food & Nutrition Magazine.

About This Blog

Stone Soup is a guest blog written by members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Content — including information, recipes and views expressed — is that of the authors and does not reflect the positions or policies of Food & Nutrition Magazine or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Bloggers are required to pledge they will not write for Stone Soup on topics, companies or trade organization they currently represent or have represented at any time.

Write for Us

Are you a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics who is interested in writing a guest blog for Stone Soup? To be considered, contact us at StoneSoup@eatright.org.

Comments Policy

Food & Nutrition Magazine provides this forum to exchange ideas, opinions and contributions within a positive community. Diverse viewpoints and constructive, respectful dialogue are welcome. Rudeness, misinformation, self-promotion and abuse are not. We reserve the right, without warning or notification, to remove comments and block users we determine violate this policy or our Terms & Conditions. You must include your name or be logged into a personal account on Disqus, Facebook, Twitter or Google+ to comment.

Archives

Recent Posts

Categories

Feed

Atom Feed Subscribe to the Stone Soup Feed »

Get Stone Soup in Your Email