Edit ModuleShow Tags
Published:

4 Ways to Fight Arthritis with What You Eat



4 Ways to Fight Arthritis with What You Eat | Food and Nutrition Magazine | Stone Soup Blog

Regina Ragone, RDN, MS Dr. Susan Mitchell, PhD, RDN, FANDThis featured post is by Regina Ragone, MS, RDN, and Susan Mitchell, PhD, RDN, FAND. You can follow Dr. Mitchell @drsusanmitchell.

Imagine trying to open a jar of peanut butter and feeling excruciating pain, or not being able to walk around the block because your feet are throbbing. For the 350 million people worldwide who suffer from arthritis, these are two of the many symptoms that they experience regularly. In fact, one of us — Regina — is among those 350 million.

Arthritis is a form of inflammation, of which the Western diet — with high intakes of red meat, sugary beverages and processed and fried foods — is highly associated. The Mediterranean diet, on the other hand, is associated with much lower levels of inflammation and is an overall healthier way to eat. Here are four ways you can fight inflammation Tweet this while enjoying a delicious way of life.

Garlic, Herbs and Spices

These ingredients — and all plant foods — contain naturally occurring plant nutrients called phytonutrients. Until science determines the exact amounts needed, use garlic, turmeric, ginger, oregano, rosemary, thyme and pepper as part of your daily diet.

Dried? Fresh? It doesn’t matter. Try spices and herbs to replace salt and kick up the flavor.

Fiber

This one may surprise you. Fiber ranks as one of the most anti-inflammatory food components. For example, dry beans and peas (also known as pulses) and whole grains contain what's called fermentable fiber, which cuts down on inflammatory reactions.

Vegetables and Fruits

These are big sources of nutrients such as vitamin C and beta-carotene and phytonutrients such as flavonols and flavones. There are two goals when it comes to fruit and vegetables: increase the quantity of servings you eat daily and broaden the variety you consume.

Omega-3s

This inflammation fighter can be found in cold-water fish such as salmon and tuna, and in plant sources such as flax and algae.

Keep in mind that eating one or two anti-inflammatory foods while maintaining an otherwise unhealthy diet is not the answer. Instead, focus on improving your overall diet over time. The key to the anti-inflammatory diet is the positive effect from consuming a variety of the foods listed above.


Regina Ragone MS, RDN, and Susan Mitchell, PhD, RDN, FAND, share the food you love, how to stay fit for life and be fabulous everyday through professional continuing education and digital/traditional media communications. Connect with them here and on Google+ and Twitter.
 

(Photo: KenTannenbaum/iStock/Thinkstock)

Edit Module

More Stone Soup

More Realistic Goals = Longer Lasting Health Results

More Realistic Goals = Longer Lasting Health Results

While it is disheartening to see how much damage the obesity crisis is doing to all generations, programs like The Biggest Loser can help convey the message that it is never too early or too late to make positive changes, provided one is willing to put in the hard work. For that they should be applauded. Still, there are some disconcerting elements at play here.
How to Keep Yourself and Your Wallet in Shape This Winter

How to Keep Yourself and Your Wallet in Shape This Winter

The CDC recommends that adults get 2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as walking, every week.
The Tomato-Watering Machine

The Tomato-Watering Machine

After a winter storm in early May and 67-degree days and drizzle in mid-June, buying plants for a garden seemed like a risk. However, my friend, who is a master gardener, convinced me. She volunteered me for an experiment she wanted to try — a tomato-watering machine.
Join Us in the Rise of Food Videos

Join Us in the Rise of Food Videos

Dietitians have a unique opportunity to share evidence-based information through food videos. Here's why we need to do it and how to get started!
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module
Advertise with Food & Nutrition
Edit ModuleShow TagsEdit ModuleShow Tags


Stone Soup

Guest bloggers from around the world share with Food & Nutrition Magazine.

About This Blog

Stone Soup is a guest blog written by members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Content — including information, recipes and views expressed — is that of the authors and does not reflect the positions or policies of Food & Nutrition Magazine or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Bloggers are required to pledge they will not write for Stone Soup on topics, companies or trade organization they currently represent or have represented at any time.

Learn about our guest blogs!

Comments Policy

Food & Nutrition Magazine provides this forum to exchange ideas, opinions and contributions within a positive community. Diverse viewpoints and constructive, respectful dialogue are welcome. Rudeness, misinformation, self-promotion and abuse are not. We reserve the right, without warning or notification, to remove comments and block users we determine violate this policy or our Terms & Conditions. You must include your name or be logged into a personal account on Disqus, Facebook, Twitter or Google+ to comment.

Archives

Edit Module

Get Stone Soup in Your RSS

Use your RSS reader's instructions to add Stone Soup to your list:

Atom Feed Subscribe to the Stone Soup Feed »

Get Our Blogs in Your Email

Stone Soup
Student Scoop