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Fudgy, Silken, Sous-Vide Style Eggs, Coming Right Up!



Food & Nutrition | Stone Soup | Fudgy, Silken Eggs, Coming Right Up Sous-Vide Style!

Photo: Krista Ulatowski, MPH, RDN


Product reviewed: Sansaire Sous Vide Machine


I was eager to review the Sansaire Sous Vide Machine given there’s been a lot of sous vide-style cooking taking place at my house for the past couple years. My boyfriend fires up our current device (in full disclosure, it’s a different brand) nearly daily, whether it’s to make eggs, salmon or chicken. I was curious to see how the Sansaire compared to other brands of sous vide machines that we had tried. What bells and whistles would stand out?  

Sous vide-style cooking continues to gain in popularity. Sous vide, French for “under-vacuum” cooking, is simply placing ingredients such as eggs, veggies, meat or seafood into sealed bags and placing them in a hot water bath at a set temperature for a duration of time that results in an evenly-cooked, tender product. To me, the main reason for cooking sous vide is to avoid dried up proteins that tend to cook unevenly in the oven.

I found that the Sansaire Sous Vide Machine is a great introductory model if you or your clients are eager to experiment with sous vide cooking.  Extremely easy to use, the machine allows you to cook veggies, eggs, seafood or meat to perfection. The Sansaire team notes that cooking veggies via sous vide is a win-win: “Vegetables retain all of their nutrients because the bag is sealed — there’s nowhere for nutrients to escape! Also, cooking foods in a sealed environment allows you to coat proteins and vegetables with a fraction of the amount of oil...”

The Sansaire machine works by clipping the device to a large vessel filled with water, picking a pot or container that is large enough to hold your food and will allow the water to circulate. Plug in the unit and hit the power button on top of the device. Set your temperature per the very thorough Sansaire Cooking Guide, which helps you to pick an option for your desired “doneness.” With a gentle twist of the ring on the upper portion of the device, watch the temp tick upward on the digital display.

Place your food, such as a piece of salmon with some olive oil and fresh rosemary, in a sealable bag — ideally, use BPA-free bags— and clip the bagged salmon to the inside of your water basin. Set a timer and you’re underway!

I tested eggs for this review, given the Sansaire team suggests “…cooking eggs sous vide is a rite of passage for every owner.” No need for bags here — just lower the eggs directly into the water. After 45 minutes at a very precise 149.8 degrees Fahrenheit, my four eggs turned out “fudgy and silken,” as promised per the guide, and ready to make my chicken, broccoli and simmer sauce entrée complete.

The Sansaire Sous Vide Machine could be used by people who are eager to experiment with sous vide cooking, and who are looking for a means of avoiding extensive meal prep. To compare, I did find that other sous vide devices on the market may be a bit sleeker, smaller and lighter. This is important for those who like to travel with the sous vide appliance, bringing it to campsites or over to your brother’s house for Thanksgiving meal prep. Some other brands also have more features such as a built-in timer that starts your device when you’re not at home.

But overall, the Sansaire is a solid model that cooks your food to perfection — and that’s what ultimately matters!


Krista Ulatowski, MPH, RDNKrista Ulatowski, MPH, RDN, is the Seattle-based owner of KUcumber Nutrition Communications, creating and implementing marketing, communications and public relations programs for health, wellness and food companies. Connect with her on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

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