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Vanilla Honey Roasted Peanut Butter



Article author photo. Maria Tadic This featured post is by Maria Tadic, RD. You can follow this blogger on Twitter @mewinebrenner.

I love peanut butter! You could probably even say I’m a peanut butter addict. It’s one of my top favorite condiments. And I put it on just about everything. Unfortunately, my all-time favorite brand is one that has a good amount of those partially hydrogenated oils (the bad fats!). 

It’s sad, but true. I’ve even decided to give up buying it because I want to choose healthier products — like the all-natural and no-sugar-added peanut butters. They’re all good in their own way, but none seem to be as good or crave-able as my old stand by. And I miss it. I just love that creamy, silky smooth, slightly sweet peanut butter. It’s almost too good to give up completely.

That is … until now. In honor of National Peanut Month, I decided to give homemade peanut butter a try. And I’m hooked! First, it has to be the easiest recipe I’ve ever made. It’s completely customizable to your desired flavors. And, it ends up with such a creamy and smooth texture, you’ll never miss the old jarred variety.

My recipe for homemade peanut butter is taken over the top with the addition of a vanilla bean and touch of honey. The peanut butter has such a nice floral and sweet flavor. It’s very unique and I think you’ll love it!  


Vanilla Honey Roasted Peanut Butter

Recipe developed by Maria Tadic, RD

Yields about 1-1 ½ cups of peanut butter

Ingredients
2 cups lightly salted peanuts
¼ cup honey
1 vanilla bean
1-2 teaspoons vegetable oil

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  2. Lay out the peanuts on a sheet pan covered with a silpat or aluminum foil coated with non stick cooking spray.
  3. Drizzle honey over nuts and toss to cover most of the nuts.
  4. Roast for 10-12 minutes. You’ll start to smell the peanuts and they will be just slightly darker in color.
  5. Immediately place nuts into the bowl of a food processor along with the seeds of the vanilla bean. Process the peanuts for about 7-9 minutes. Scraping down the sides every so often.
  6. Add in the vegetable oil in the last minute or two — this helps ensure the peanut butter's silky smooth texture.

Note: The nuts will first be ground down into what looks like wet sand. Keep processing the peanuts and they will start to turn into a smoother mixture. Process until you reach your desire smoothness — adding the vegetable oil in at the end will help with this process. However, you can leave the oil out if desired.


Maria Tadic, RD, is a registered dietitian currently working in the field of Bariatric Surgery and Nutrition. She lives in Northern Virginia with her husband. She's a foodie, runner, blogger and self proclaimed home chef! Read more from Maria on her blog, Bean A Foodie, or follow her on Twitter, Facebook or Pinterest.

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