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Go Vertical with a Salad Stack



Go Vertical with a 'Salad Stack' | Food and Nutrition Magazine | Stone Soup Blog

Article author photo. Jenny Beth Kroplin, RD, LDN, CLC This featured post is by Jenny Beth Kroplin, RD, LDN, CLC. Follow this blogger on Twitter @JennyBethRD.

Ditch the bowl and elevate your salad! Welcome to the "salad stack," a scrumptious salad preparation that is visually unique and sure to get your taste buds humming. What's the appeal to a stacked salad? I believe keeping food healthy, fun and balanced helps to build and sustain a healthy eating pattern for a lifetime — and the salad stack is just, plain fun! 

For this recipe, I layered sweet and savory flavors — fresh greens, roasted sweet potatoes, honeyed goat cheese and fresh roasted beets — and topped them with a drizzle of olive oil, aged balsamic vinegar and honey.


Sweet Beet Salad Stack Tweet this

Recipe by Jenny Beth Kroplin, RD, LDN, CLC

Ingredients

  • 1 medium sweet potato, cleaned and peeled
  • 1 medium beet, cleaned and peeled
  • 2 ounces goat cheese
  • ½ cup fresh greens
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons aged balsamic vinegar
  • 1½ tablespoons honey, divided
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Using a sharp knife, slice sweet potato and beet in round slices, about ½-inch thick.
  3. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and spray with with nonstick cooking spray. Place sweet potato and beet slices on pan. Slightly drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt and ground pepper. Roast for 20 minutes until tender and remove from oven.
  4. While sweet potato and beet slices are roasting, place the goat cheese and ½ tablespoon honey together in a small bowl. Use a spoon to combine goat cheese and honey.
  5. Start creating salad stack. First, plate a handful of salad greens. Then, place one slice roasted sweet potato on top of greens. Then, add a layer of honeyed goat cheese. Then, add a slice of roasted beet. . Then add another layer of honeyed goat cheese. Repeat the layering three times (so you use three slices of sweet potatoes and three slices of beets), ending with a slice of beet on top. Add one final salad green for a fancy-looking presentation.
  6. Drizzle with olive oil, balsamic vinegar and remaining honey. Serves 1.


Jenny Beth Kroplin, RD, LDN, CLC, is a Nashville-based registered dietitian, certified lactation consultant, nutrition education consultant and family nutrition counselor. She is a past-president of the Nashville Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Read her blog, and connect with her on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter.
 

(Photo: Jenny Beth Kroplin, RD, LDN, CLC)

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