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A Stove-to-Serve French Soup Pot



A Stove-to-Serve French Soup Pot

Photo: Emile Henry USA


Product reviewed: Emile Henry Flame® Soup Pot in Burgundy


There is nothing better than an elegant pot that can go from stove to oven to table. I go weak at the knees in cooking stores, especially when I see a piece that is timeless, handsome and will last forever. This wine-red French soup pot certainly had that effect on me. So, is it as wonderful as it appears?

The Emile Henry Soup Pot is made with Flame® ceramic, which can be used on any type of stovetop or in the oven and microwave.  Metal utensils won’t damage the glaze, and the pot can safely go up to 930°F (500°C) and is also able to go from the freezer directly to a hot oven. This pot is sturdy and versatile, and its 4.2-quart (4-liter) capacity also means that you can make a large one-pot meal for the family.

Once I brought the soup pot out of the box, I was eager to start using it. I’m glad, though, that I took a moment to open the information booklet because I almost missed the bolded instructions to boil a liter of milk in the pot for 5 minutes before cooling and washing the pot. I presume this has to do with the special ceramic or glaze that Emile Henry uses. After prepping my soup pot, I started to make a lentil soup by browning some onion and garlic in a little oil. An impatient cook, I usually like to blast the heat to get the food cooking quickly, but I had to slow down and use low heat for the first five minutes before gradually increasing the heat, per the guidelines.

The end result was excellent, and I could conveniently serve dinner directly from the pot. Since the low and slow method works best, I can see any assortment of stews, soups, curries and chilis working exceptionally well. It was also extremely easy to pour leftovers from the pot directly into glass storage containers thanks to the curved edge that is easy to grip and makes a great pour spout. It, however, didn’t live up to one claim — this unique edge is supposed to prevent liquid from boiling over the pot’s edge, but in the pre-use process of boiling milk, I managed to lose a good amount as it made its way down the outside of the pot to make a mess on my gas stove.

If you’re up for a flavorful meal that takes a little longer than if made in a metal pot, this Emile Henry soup pot is for you. It is a delight to use and might help get more family dinners and homemade meals on the table. This is truly a fabulously functional and classically beautiful soup pot.


Michaela Ballmann, MS, RDMichaela Ballmann, MS, RD, is a registered dietitian and graduate of Loma Linda University. She has clinical experience from Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena, Calif. In addition, she is a Certified LEAP therapist assisting those with food sensitivities. Read Michaela's blog and listen to her podcast at Wholify.com, and follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

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