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Kitchen Gems — for the Right Cook



Kitchen Gems — for the Right Cook

Photo: Tessa Nguyen, RD, LDN


Product reviewed: Swiss Diamond 5” Utility Knife, 8” Chef Knife and 8.5” Bread Knife


As both a chef and RD, testing out new knives is like being a kid in a candy store. I love seeing if there’s new technology implemented into the blades themselves, new ergonomic handles or just a classically made knife. I use a variety of knife brands and types on a regular basis, so I was excited to see what Swiss Diamond knives had in store for me.

All three Swiss Diamond knives are stunning.  From the tip of their ice hardened blades to the Swiss Diamond logo forged into the end of the black resin handle, I found the knives’ simple design aesthetically pleasing.

I tried out the 8” Chef Knife first. I prefer a traditional chef’s knife, as I find it more ergonomically pleasing than a Santoku style knife. This chef’s knife didn’t have as much of a curve in the blade as I’m used to, so it didn’t feel as fluid cutting through herbs and vegetables. I use a rocking motion when I cut, so if you are a “chopper,” picking up the knife to cut through each item individually, this knife’s design would likely work well for you.

Next up was the 8.5” Bread Knife. There’s something so inviting about a bread knife, knowing you can effortlessly slice through loaves and loaves with no resistance and without crushing the bread itself. This knife did not let me down. I also tried it out on a few sweet potatoes, just to see if it would be as useful in a non-bread fashion. It worked well, and the serrated blade made for a nice little pattern in the potatoes.

The 5” Utility Knife is a touch larger than most paring knives, but smaller than a chef’s knife. Peeling a few apples and kiwis was a little tricky due to the size, and I didn’t feel safe peeling through the fruit in my hand. It was also awkward to cut onions, as I felt inefficient in my slicing. However, I think this knife would be a great “chef’s knife” for a child to use while getting used to cooking — with plenty of adult supervision, of course, as all the knives are super sharp!

Although I didn’t find the knives to be overall comfortable per my cutting style, Swiss Diamond’s knives are undoubtedly made from quality, durable materials. I get asked all the time for my favorite brand or style of knife, and I always say you have to find what feels good to you. I would recommend testing out the knives at a local kitchen specialty store as the best way to find out if you’ll feel comfortable with each knife before purchasing them. Swiss Diamond knives are sold in many specialty cooking stores across the U.S., so you can do just that.


Tessa Nguyen, RD, LDN, is a chef and registered dietitian working in the Triangle area of North Carolina. She is an alumna of Johnson & Wales University and Meredith College. When Tessa isn't traveling and discovering new restaurants, she teaches culinary nutrition cooking classes at Duke and works as a consultant in the food and nutrition industries. Connect with her at Taste Nutrition Consulting and follow her on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.

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