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Stone Soup

Guest bloggers from around the world share with Food & Nutrition Magazine.

Garden of Eden, Garden of Healthy Eating

Tu B'Shevat is the Jewish celebration of the start of the planting season. It is also interesting to note that these "Trees of the Garden" are today found to be some of our healthiest foods!

Become a Snacktivist

Today's kids get about 500 calories a day from snacks, but the big problem is what they're snacking on. According to researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, children get most of their snacks in the form of chips, cookies, crackers and processed foods made with refined white flour, salt, sugar, and artificial flavors and colors.

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Something's Cooking at Your Local Carniceria

If you've ever eaten marinated grilled meat from a carniceria, you know there is a bit of magic that goes into the preparation.

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Massaged Kale Salad with Variations

There are many different ways to prepare kale, from adding it to soups and stews to making kale chips, but the easiest cooking method is giving it a special treatment by preparing a massaged kale salad. Young tender kale and the "dinosaur kale" variety work especially well for this simple-yet-delicious recipe. Making a massaged kale salad can be a fun cooking activity for your children too. Getting their hands dirty in the kitchen is always fun for the little ones.

Weekday Leg of Lamb

Lamb can be intimidating meat to cook. For many, it's a celebratory dish served once or twice a year—with a high degree of difficulty. The iconic leg of lamb can be a perfect dinner party centerpiece, or, if cooking time and technique aren't mastered, a disaster. While I can't disagree, I'll show you how to enjoy it in a much simpler way.

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The Low-FODMAP App for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

A diet that has the potential to manage symptoms in three out of four people with IBS is now at your fingertips. Learn about the app for people digestive woes.

Advice for Dietetic Interns

Part of becoming a registered dietitian is the completion of a supervised internship. This is similar to a residency for a physician in that you work for a short period of time in several areas; you get to put your theory into practice and see what area of the field you may wish to focus your career on. The internship is an exciting time but also a busy time. Here is my best advice for anyone in or about to start their internship.

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What It's Like to Be a Registered Dietitian in Sin City

I've been living in Las Vegas for almost three years now, and what a whirlwind it has been! Adopting the "Vegas lifestyle" has been exciting, exhausting...and expensive. As a dietitian, my main focus is with our health and wellness. Here are seven tips for living in the Vegas Valley with vitality and vibrancy.

How to Serve Toddlers

Feeding your toddler really could be a full-time job. You want him or her to get all their nutrients and eat a variety of food groups, while limiting processed foods. Combine that with the toddler's personality: one day they'll eat ravenously and enjoy everything, the next day it'll just be crackers and milk (oh yes, I speak from experience). It can be exhausting!

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Don't Start Dieting Just Yet

The holidays are over. It's time to assess the damage caused by delicious treats, fun cocktail parties and festive dinners that made us feel so good but now give us a sense of regret. It's time to repent, shed quickly the extra pounds we gained and return to the path of nutritional righteousness. Or is it?

To Buy Free-Range, or Not to Buy Free-Range

"Free-range." It's a relatively new term; it's slightly misunderstood; and it's used all the time regarding meat and dairy products. How would you define free-range? Is it something you have considered previously when choosing which products to buy at the grocery store or farmers market? Should free-range products be a priority for you and your family?

Food and Fortune for 2013

Growing up in the Carolinas, I always knew what would be on the dinner table come New Year's Day. Without fail, my Grandma would make collard greens, Hoppin' John (field peas and rice), cornbread, and meat (usually ham). With a handful of other superstitions, this traditional Southern meal was eaten for luck and good fortune in the New Year.

Yes, You Can Keep Your New Year's Resolutions!

As the New Year approaches, many of us naturally begin to think about what we would like to do differently next year. I've often waited until December 31st, or even January 1st (and maybe even the 2nd!—to jot down my New Year's goals. From experience, waiting that long can often lead to disaster for falling through as the year moves forward.

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Happy "Shogatsu" for Japanese New Year

In Japan, New Year's—shogatsu—is one of the most important holidays of the year. Just like all major holidays for the different cultures and religions out there, Japan has a special food for this holiday. Maybe you have heard of it? Mochi. Yes, I said mochi. Let me guess, you have heard of this!

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Love Avocado? Thank Los Aztecas

If you have ever had fresh-made guacamole or chicken tostadas with avocado, you will agree with me: The avocado is unique! This fruit's origin in central Mexico goes back thousands of years, when los Aztecas thought it had aphrodisiac properties.

Get to Know Your Farmer

The "buy local" movement has a lot of momentum and has done great things for local farm economies, not to mention the health benefits of eating food produced in season and from within your own community. But having lived abroad and traveled extensively and thought of all the farmers I know around this globe, I've decided there are merits to being both a "locavore" and a "globavore."

How to Stop Saying "Eat Your Vegetables"

Whether you claim to have a picky eater or not, most kids tend to shy away from vegetables and lean toward starch-heavy foods like pasta, rice, cereals and snacks. After working with many parents on improving their children's diets, here are my top tips and favorite meal ideas using vegetables.

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A Healthy Holiday Snack Worth Traveling For

The holidays are a busy time for everyone, and health goals can take a hit. Between the temptations of airport food and road trip drive-thrus, it's hard to stay with your healthy lifestyle while traveling.

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How People with Eating Disorders Can Overcome Holiday Stress

The holidays are a wonderful—and wonderfully stressful—time of year for all of us, but the stress is amplified for anyone struggling with an eating disorder. Numerous celebrations with particularly indulgent food and potentially socially stressful situations with friends and family is a lot to manage!

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Red and Green Gnocchi for the Holidays

In the midst of all this holiday madness, it's more important than ever to stay healthy with home-cooked, well-balanced meals. With holiday parties, work events, cocktail receptions and family reunions this time of year, it's easy to let healthy cooking fall to the wayside. Who has any more time to spend in the kitchen after baking for the cookie swap and wrapping all those gifts!? One of my favorite meals to make during hectic times is this gnocchi-based dish with beans, tomatoes and greens.

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Healthy Holiday Entertaining

This time of year, I love to host a gathering for our closest friends. Here are some tips on what I do to get ready for a party and my favorite recipes for healthy entertaining during the holiday season. There’s no need to get frazzled hosting a party, with a few simple tricks, you can be relaxed and enjoy healthy food with your family and friends.

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Get to Know—and Cook!—the Food of the Future

If there is one trendy food that you have to take seriously, it is quinoa. You may already know about this crop and its outstanding nutritional properties—it is considered a "super grain" not only because all of its nutritional benefits, but also because it's easy to cultivate (it grows almost everywhere!). What's more, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has declared 2013 the "International Year of the Quinoa."

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Stone Soup

Guest bloggers from around the world share with Food & Nutrition Magazine.

About This Blog

Stone Soup is a guest blog written by members of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Content — including information, recipes and views expressed — is that of the authors and does not reflect the positions or policies of Food & Nutrition Magazine or the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Bloggers are required to pledge they will not write for Stone Soup on topics, companies or trade organization they currently represent or have represented at any time.

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Food & Nutrition Magazine provides this forum to exchange ideas, opinions and contributions within a positive community. Diverse viewpoints and constructive, respectful dialogue are welcome. Rudeness, misinformation, self-promotion and abuse are not. We reserve the right, without warning or notification, to remove comments and block users we determine violate this policy or our Terms & Conditions. You must include your name or be logged into a personal account on Disqus, Facebook, Twitter or Google+ to comment.

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